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US Treasury Issues Assets Advisory on Nicaragua


Photo: RRNoticias

By THE PULSE NEWS MEXICO STAFF    

The U.S. Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) published an advisory on Thursday, Oct. 4, warning United States financial institutions that senior foreign political figures connected to the regime of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega may seek to transfer proceeds from acts of political corruption into the United States financial system.

The statement added that the advisory is a strong signal that the administration of U.S. President Donald J. Trump will not tolerate the Ortega regime’s continued indiscriminate use of violence, repressive tactics and corruption, which have worsened the economic situation of Nicaragua’s people.

“The United States calls for the peaceful restoration of democracy and the rule of law in Nicaragua, which are foundational to long-term economic stability,” the advisory said.

Over the course of the last five months, the U.S. government has repeatedly condemned the use of violence by the Ortega regime, calling on the Nicaraguan government “to respect the rights of protesters and to create the conditions needed for a credible dialogue, including the cessation of all violence.”

Nicaragua has seen months of deadly protests against Ortega and his wife and vice-president Rosario Murillo and their policies, in particular in the area of social security, in the capital and other cities.

After several violent government attacks on protestors, which left many dead and injured, the Trump administration issued a statement saying in May saying: “Those responsible for killings and other human rights abuses and violations must be brought to justice … The government of Nicaragua should allow independent international human rights organizations, such as the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, to assess the human rights situation in Nicaragua. We reiterate our strong support for the Nicaraguan people and their demands for genuine democracy.”

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Categories: International Relations, Latin America, United StatesTags: , , , , , , , , ,

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