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North to Alaska


Pulse News Mexico photo/Larry Anthony Pannell

By LARRY ANTHONY PANNELL    

The summer cruise season is upon us, and there is no place better to cruise at this time than Alaska. I firmly believe that everyone should cruise to Alaska at least once in their lifetime. It is nothing short of magnificent.

There are many ways to get to Alaska, but there is nothing quite as comfortable and convenient as getting there by on a cruise ship. Pulse News Mexico photo/Larry Anthony Pannell

There are many ways to reach Alaska, including driving or flying, but nothing offers the spectacular views, convenience or entertainment of a modern luxury cruise ship. There are no luxury hotels at the ports, but the accommodations on passenger ships range from modest, budget-priced cabins to luxurious staterooms.

Depending on your itinerary, there are several ports of call where you can embark, including Seattle, Washington, and Vancouver and Victoria, in British Columbia. Typically, Alaska cruises last seven days, but there is a 10-day cruise leaving from San Francisco. Another port where you can embark or disembark is Whitter, Alaska, for those wanting to visit Denali National Park.

Travelling the Inside Passage through British Columbia and Alaska allows you to appreciate the stunning landscapes and fresh air while relaxing on your private balcony as the ship glides through the calm waters. You may also see an array of wildlife, including orcas, dolphins and humpback whales, as well as bears, mountain goats and bald eagles.

A bald eagle shot during an Aleutian Ballad Crab fishing tour. Pulse News Mexico photo/Larry Anthony Pannell

On most cruises, you will visit three ports of calls Ketchikan, Juneau and Skagway, each of which have their own charm and distinct personalities. Each town has numerous restaurants, places to shop and what seems like an endless amount of tours and shore excursions. Tours are offered both from the ships and from private companies.

I have spent seven summers traveling to Alaska and the Inside Passage as an acupuncture physician on various cruise lines which has given me an insider’s view and perspective. Here are some of my favorite tours:

Two of my favorites are located in Ketchikan, a town of approximately 14,000 residents and Alaska’s first city. It is also the second-rainiest city in the United States, averaging 13 feet a year. Be prepared for downpours, but the majority of the summer season, the weather can be very nice.

One of the advantages of taking a tour with Rich Lee is his uncanny knack for finding wildlife. Pulse News Mexico photo/Larry Anthony Pannell

Aurora Birds and Bears encompasses all of Ketchikan’s sights and sounds and specializes in custom tours. The owner/operator Rich Lee is a Native American of the Tlingit tribe. He was born and raised in Ketchikan, giving him a distinct advantage over many of the tour operators that are summer transplants.

During a three-hour tour, you will be offered a history lesson on Ketchikan, enjoy the rainforest and a waterfall and visit “real” totem poles, not replicas. Lee’s biggest expertise, however, is locating wildlife. Many times on the tour, we encountered black bear, deer, bald eagles and, at times, even orca and whales have been spotted from the shore.

My other favorite is the Deadliest Catch Crab Fishing Tour. If you are a fan of the television show, you might be interested to know that the Aleutian Ballad of season two is now homeported in Ketchikan. Captain/owner David Lethine and his crew of merry misfits are all seasoned crab fisherman of the Bering Sea and share their vast knowledge during the three-hour tour. This hands-on experience enables you to hold live crab, spotted prawns and other creatures of the sea.

Humpback whales bubble net feeding. Pulse News Mexico photo/Larry Anthony Pannell

The highlight for many is a side trip to Annette Island, where dozens of bald eagles await your arrival. As the boat nears the island, 30 to 40 eagles leave their perches like a swarm of mosquitos as the crew toss herring into the water. It is literally like ringing the dinner bell as the eagles fly within feet of the boat, attacking the water in their quest for a free meal. It is truly incredible to behold and a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

In Skagway, I highly recommend taking a flight over Glacier Bay National Park with Paul Swanstrom, the owner/pilot of the Mountain Flying Service at the Skagway Airport. This seasoned Alaskan aviator provides an unforgettable experience with each seat having a window allowing you to witness the grandeur of mountain peaks crowned with white virgin snow. Fly over multiple glaciers as they wind their way through the valleys of the countryside on the way to the sea. Flights range from one to two hours, with the option to land on a glacier or a remote beach.

The glacial landscapes are hauntingly beautiful. Pulse News Mexico photo/Larry Anthony Pannell

If you want to see whales, the capital city of Juneau is the port to book your whales excursion. There are numerous tours with a wide variety of options, including everything from private yachts to limited load tours to those offering a salmon bake and wildlife quests.

My personal favorite is the Discover Alaska Whale Tour. This limited load and small boat tour has a naturalist on board who will share scientific knowledge and research on whales and other sea life that you may encounter. The windows open in, so even in poor weather you are warm and dry and have ample opportunities to take photographs.

One of the many reasons people cruise to Alaska during the summer is to experience its glaciers, many of which can only be reached by cruise ship. Words are hard to come by when trying to explain the sights and sounds of these glorious towers laced with blue ice. You will witness history as these living structures march only to terminate at the water’s edge and calving into the sea.

The author’s “Alaska and the Inside Passage – A Guide to the Ports, Tours and Shore Excursions,” offers a detailed description of sites, restaurants and excursions. Pulse News Mexico photo/Larry Anthony Pannell

For more information on cruising to Alaska and its ports, my book “Alaska and the Inside Passage – A Guide to the Ports, Tours and Shore Excursions,” covers this in greater detail, including my favorite restaurants and more excursions to explore.

What I think sets my book apart from most tour guides on Alaska (outside of my wonderful writing and insightful knowledge of the area, of course) is that I have included plenty of my own photographs (not stock photos). Consequently, my book is designed not only a travel guide, but also as a coffee table book. It is visually rich, but is small enough to travel with so that you can always have the information at your fingertips.

Larry Anthony Pannell is a professional photojournalist originally from southern California who is also a licensed acupuncture physician with a degree in traditional Chinese medicine. Since 2010, he has served as an “acupuncturist at sea,” offering his services on several international cruise lines while traveling the Seven Seas. He specializes in landscape, travel, nature and wildlife photography, and more samples of his work can be seen on his webpage. He can be reached at pannell.photography@icloud.com.

 

 

 

 

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Categories: Environment, Lifestyles, Travel, United StatesTags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

1 comment

  1. Again liked your Commentary of Alaska. I lived in Anchorage in 1978. I arrived in February and left in November. I loved how the 20 hrs of darkness became 22 hrs. of daylight in a matter of a couple of months gaining 6 more minutes each day until June 21 to the longest day. The sun finally dips below the horizon leaving twilight until the sun rises again around 1:30 am. Never would get totally dark during this time period. We would go to the Russian river at 2 am to catch Red Salmon with a limit of 3 per person. At 7 am many people would come and fill the banks elbow to elbow to the point of not fun any more. So we would jump in a Zodiac boat and float down river catching Grayling, Dolly Varden, steelhead trout and rainbow trout. Some great times fishing and seeing wildlife throughout Alaska..
    Fishing for King Salmon on the Kenai river and Silver Salmon on the Alexander River the only way to get tto the alexander river is by float plane drop you off and come pick you back up when you want them to. Mosquitoes bigger than flies swarming along the banks sitting in a boat on the river perchance of catching a big Silver Salmon. Bears may come and visit or even a Moose and Eagles flying above.
    Time to check out of Alaska was November got too cold and the long dark days began to wear on me and had to come back to Laguna. The beauty of Alaska and the aurora borealis moment I will treasure forever. I have been back to fish many times since but those introductory months will always be my wild frontier days

    Like

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